turquoise parrot Mount Canobolas unique biodiversity

Threatened Species

Twelve threatened species occur within the SCA including two locally endemic plant species, four mammals and six birds. The SCA provides a valuable refuge for existence, feeding, breeding and surviving from habitat losses.

Threatened Plants

Prostanthera gilesii
The endemic shrub Prostanthera gilesii [formerly P. sp. C] (Giles’ Mintbush) is only known from two small colonies and has been listed as Critically Endangered under the BC Act
The endemic shrub Prostanthera gilesii [formerly P. sp. C] (Giles’ Mintbush) is only known from two small colonies and has been listed as Critically Endangered under the BC Act.

The tree Eucalyptus canobolensis [syn. E. rubida subsp. canobolensis] (Silver-leaf Candlebark or Canobolas Candlebark) occurs throughout the SCA and is endemic to the Mt Canobolas precinct. Its stronghold is above 1,000 m altitude in the SCA but occurs sporadically down to ± 900 m altitude on the slopes surrounding the mountain. With a propensity to form hollows, the species provides valuable nesting and roosting habitat as well as copious manna exudate as a food source for arboreal mammals and birds. It is listed as
Vulnerable under the BC Act and Endangered under the EPBC Act.

Eucalyptus canobolensis endemic to the Mt Canobolas precinct
Eucalyptus canobolensis the species provides valuable nesting and roosting habitat as well as copious manna exudate as a food source for arboreal mammals and birds. Photo by Jenny Medd
Bird nesting hollows provided by endangered Eucalyptus canobolensis
Eucalyptus canobolensis With a propensity to form hollows, the species provides valuable nesting and roosting habitat as well as copious manna exudate as a food source for arboreal mammals and birds. Photo by Jenny Medd

 

 

 

 

Threatened Mammals

Petauroides volans (Greater Glider) ranges throughout eastern Australia, occurring from north Queensland through to central Victoria, from sea level to 1200 m altitude. This Glider favours forests with a diversity of eucalypt species, providing food sources across seasons. It is a common glider in the SCA owing to an abundance of tree hollows and food provided by the diverse suite of eucalypts. It is listed as Vulnerable under the EPBC Act.

Petauroides volans (Greater-Glider). Photo by Steve Parish
Petauroides volans (Greater-Glider). Photo by Steve Parish

Petaurus australis (Yellow-bellied Glider) is an arboreal glider found along the east coast to the western slopes of the GDR. With a preference for tall mature eucalypt forest generally in areas with high rainfall and nutrient rich soils, the SCA provides an ideal habitat. E. canobolensis undoubtedly offers a valuable roosting habitat together with a food source from copious manna secretions. It is listed as Vulnerable under the BC Act.

Petaurus-australis (Yellow bellied Glider). Photo by Steve Parish
Petaurus-australis (Yellow bellied Glider). Photo by Steve Parish

Saccolaimus flaviventris (Yellow-bellied Sheathtail Bat) is a wide-ranging insectivorous mammal that forages above forest and grassland canopies in northern and eastern Australia and is suspected of being migratory. It is listed as Vulnerable under the BC Act.  Yellow-bellied Sheathtail-bat – profile

Saccolaimus flaviventris (Yellow-bellied Sheathtail Bat)
Saccolaimus flaviventris (Yellow-bellied Sheathtail Bat). Photo by Terry Reardon from the South Australian Museum

Miniopterus orianae oceanensis (Eastern Bent-wing Bat) is primarily a cave dwelling mammal found mainly in coastal districts of eastern Australia. This unusual species for the SCA is known to frequent other high altitude forest areas, making use of rock habitats and hunts insects, particularly moths in the montane environments. It is listed as Vulnerable under the BC Act. Eastern Bentwing-bat – profile

Miniopterus orianae oceanensis - Eastern Bent-winged Bat Photo by Marg Turton
Miniopterus orianae oceanensis – Eastern Bent-winged Bat Photo by Marg Turton

Threatened Birds

Artamus cyanopterus (Dusky Woodswallow) is widespread in eastern, southern and southwestern Australia and is widespread in NSW from the coast to inland, including the western slopes of the GDR and farther west. It occurs in a wide range of habitats but is considered to be a woodland dependent bird breeding mostly along the slopes and feeding mainly on invertebrates. It is listed as Vulnerable under the BC Act. Dusky Woodswallow – profile

Dusky Wood Swallows -SAVE Mt Canobolas SCA
Dusky Wood Swallows -SAVE Mt Canobolas SCA. Photo by Rosemary Stapleton

Petroica phoenicea (Flame Robin)

Petroica phoenicea (Flame Robin) is a small Australian Robin that occurs throughout south eastern Australia. Predominantly a woodland bird it breeds in higher terrain areas such as the SCA before dispersing over winter onto the slopes and near plains in NSW. The degradation and loss of primary habitat, especially those that contain abundant logs and fallen timber underlies its listing as Vulnerable under the BC Act. Flame Robin – Profile

Petroica phoenicea (Flame Robin)
Petroica phoenicea (Flame Robin). Photo by John French

 

Petroica boodang (Scarlet Robin)

Petroica boodang (Scarlet Robin) is a small Australian Robin that occurs throughout south eastern Australia. Predominantly a woodland bird it breeds in higher terrain areas such as the SCA before dispersing onto the slopes and near plains in NSW. The degradation and loss of primary habitat, especially those that contain abundant logs and fallen timber underlies its listing as Vulnerable under the BC Act. Scarlet Robin – Profile 

Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang) male. Photo by JJ Harrison
Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang) male. Photo by JJ Harrison

Daphoenositta chrysoptera (Varied Sittella)

Daphoenositta chrysoptera (Varied Sittella) is a small songbird. Although widespread in NSW it has undergone a decline due to the clearing of forest and woodland habitats. It feeds on arthropods in rough or decorticating bark, dead branches, standing dead trees and small branches and twigs in eucalypt canopies. As a sedentary species it is likely to be a permanent resident of the SCA. It is listed as Vulnerable under the BC Act. Varied Sittella – Profile

Daphoenositta chrysoptera (Varied Sittella)
Daphoenositta chrysoptera (Varied Sittella). Photo by Warren Chad

Neophema pulchella (Turquoise Parrot)

Neophema pulchella (Turquoise Parrot) is a distinctively coloured Parrot that ranges throughout most of eastern NSW. Living mainly around the edges of woodlands it feeds mostly on the ground, foraging for seed, and nests in hollows of stumps and trees. It is listed as Vulnerable under the BC Act. Turquoise Parrot Profile

turquoise parrot Mount Canobolas unique biodiversity
Neophema pulchella (Turquoise Parrot) Living mainly around the edges of woodlands it feeds mostly on the ground, foraging for seed, and nests in hollows of stumps and trees. Photo by Rosemary Stapleton

Hieraaetus morphnoides (Little Eagle)

Hieraaetus morphnoides (Little Eagle) is a medium sized bird of prey that has undergone declines in population principally due to clearing, habitat degradation and loss of prey species. It is listed as Vulnerable under the BC Act. Little Eagle – Profile  

Hieraaetus morphnoides (Little Eagle)
Hieraaetus morphnoides (Little Eagle) has undergone declines in population principally due to clearing, habitat degradation and loss of prey species. Photo by Rosemary Stapleton
Photo Credit: Turquoise Parrot Photo by Rosemary Stapleton

A Natural Laboratory    |    Endangered Ecological Communities